Dawoud Bey, Mary Parker and Caela Cowan, 2012. Archival pigment prints mounted on dibond. 40 x 64 inches (two separate 40 x 32 inch photographs).
There is an excellent New York Times Lens Blog post by Maurice Berger, “Reimagining a Tragedy, 50 Years Later,” discussing Dawoud Bey’s series The Birmingham Project. Bey’s portraits are stunning, masterful examples of contemporary documentary photography that reflects upon and reframes history. In this case, Bey invites us to consider the tragedy of the16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama (the 50th anniversary is this Sunday, September 15th).
As Bey explains of his work, “I wanted to give tangible and palpable physical presence to the young people martyred that day…While the horror of the day is clear, the actual identities of the young people have become abstracted in a fuzzy and mythic kind of way.”
As a boy, Bey had encountered a photo originally published in Life Magazine, which depicted Sarah Jean Collins, one of the survivors of the Baptist Church bombing. (Her sister, Addie Mae Collins, was killed that day, as were five other children.)
This image is unapologetically graphic and terrifying to contemplate. Bey’s portraits offer a powerful counterpoint to the photograph and to those horrific events.
His subjects are neither helpless victims nor objects of pity. They are individuals, who, as Berger recounts, were active participants in the photo shoot. Each looks out to the camera, to the photographer, and to us with an unflinching, direct gaze. They look out, and we see them; through this exchange, we connect an abstract, “historical” past with the present.
Read about the The Birmingham Project series on the Lens blog, and see Bey’s photographs here. View Larger  →

Dawoud Bey, Mary Parker and Caela Cowan, 2012. Archival pigment prints mounted on dibond. 40 x 64 inches (two separate 40 x 32 inch photographs).

There is an excellent New York Times Lens Blog post by Maurice Berger, “Reimagining a Tragedy, 50 Years Later,” discussing Dawoud Bey’s series The Birmingham Project.

Bey’s portraits are stunning, masterful examples of contemporary documentary photography that reflects upon and reframes history. In this case, Bey invites us to consider the tragedy of the16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama (the 50th anniversary is this Sunday, September 15th).

As Bey explains of his work, “I wanted to give tangible and palpable physical presence to the young people martyred that day…While the horror of the day is clear, the actual identities of the young people have become abstracted in a fuzzy and mythic kind of way.”

As a boy, Bey had encountered a photo originally published in Life Magazine, which depicted Sarah Jean Collins, one of the survivors of the Baptist Church bombing. (Her sister, Addie Mae Collins, was killed that day, as were five other children.)

This image is unapologetically graphic and terrifying to contemplate. Bey’s portraits offer a powerful counterpoint to the photograph and to those horrific events.

His subjects are neither helpless victims nor objects of pity. They are individuals, who, as Berger recounts, were active participants in the photo shoot. Each looks out to the camera, to the photographer, and to us with an unflinching, direct gaze. They look out, and we see them; through this exchange, we connect an abstract, “historical” past with the present.

Read about the The Birmingham Project series on the Lens blog, and see Bey’s photographs here.

kahemimages:

In guns we trust de Nicolas Lévesque sera présenté dans la catégorie “Short cuts Canada” du Toronto International Film Festival.
Lundi le 9 septembre
TIFF Bell Lightbox 3
10:00 PM
Mardi le 10 septembre
TIFF Bell Lightbox 4
2:45 PM
TIFF

Extraordinary photographs by Nicolas Lévesque and Christian Lamontagne, two members of the KAHEM photo collective, featured in the webdoc In Guns We Trust (dir. Nicolas Lévesque, 2013).
Highly suggest you check them out on the KAHEM website gallery here and here.
And a brief interview with the director, Nicolas Lévesque View Larger  →

kahemimages:

In guns we trust de Nicolas Lévesque sera présenté dans la catégorie “Short cuts Canada” du Toronto International Film Festival.

Lundi le 9 septembre

TIFF Bell Lightbox 3

10:00 PM

Mardi le 10 septembre

TIFF Bell Lightbox 4

2:45 PM

TIFF

Extraordinary photographs by Nicolas Lévesque and Christian Lamontagne, two members of the KAHEM photo collective, featured in the webdoc In Guns We Trust (dir. Nicolas Lévesque, 2013).

Highly suggest you check them out on the KAHEM website gallery here and here.

And a brief interview with the director, Nicolas Lévesque

Esther Bubley, Washington, D.C. Saddle shoes are still popular at Woodrow Wilson High School, October 1943. Medium format nitrate negative; 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 inches.

Library of Congress, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, black & white negatives. Digital file: http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d33948 View Larger  →

Esther Bubley, Washington, D.C. Saddle shoes are still popular at Woodrow Wilson High School, October 1943. Medium format nitrate negative; 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 inches.

Library of Congress, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, black & white negatives. Digital file: http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d33948

She Who Tells A Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World opens today at the MFA Boston.

Great Lens Blog post by Kerri MacDonald on the exhibition: A Show of Strength by Middle Eastern Women Photographers

Looks like a nice exhibition catalogue, too.

From the MFA Boston exhibition website:

She Who Tells a Story” introduces the pioneering work of twelve leading women photographers from Iran and the Arab world: Jananne Al-Ani, Boushra Almutawakel, Gohar Dashti, Rana El Nemr, Lalla Essaydi, Shadi Ghadirian, Tanya Habjouqa, Rula Halawani, Nermine Hammam, Rania Matar, Shirin Neshat, and Newsha Tavakolian.

These prominent photographers have tackled the very notion of representation with passion and power, questioning tradition and challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. Their provocative work ranges from fine art to photojournalism and provides insights into political and social issues, including questions of personal identity and exploring the complex political and social landscapes of their home regions in images of great sophistication, expressiveness, and beauty.
(Top left)
Tanya Habjouqa, Women of Gaza 3, 2009. Museum purchase with general funds and the Horace W. Goldsmith Fund for Photography. © Tanya Habjouqa.
(Top right):
Shirin Neshat, Roja, 2012. Photograph, gelatin silver print with India ink. Charles Bain Hoyt Fund and Francis Welch Fund. Copyright Shirin Neshat.
(Bottom):
Lalla Assia Essaydi, Bullet Revisited #3, 2012. Triptych, three chromogenic prints on aluminum. Courtesy of the artist, Miller Yezerski Gallery Boston, and Edwynn Houk Gallery NYC.
blakegopnik:

Daily Pic: This is one image from a 2012 series made by the conceptual artist Sherrie Levine that involves near-perfect duplicates of photos taken by the great German photographer August Sander in the 1920s and 30s, from his “People of the 20th Century” project. Both Levine’s versions and Sander’s are now on view at Paula Cooper Gallery in New York. Levine’s best works all duplicate (or, more correctly, appropriate) works by other artists, which makes her the most derivative creator ever – and by that token, one of the most innovative. The visual impact of source and copy may be similar, but their social and intellectual impact are utterly different. Proof of that lies in the …
Read More
View Larger  →

blakegopnik:

Daily Pic: This is one image from a 2012 series made by the conceptual artist Sherrie Levine that involves near-perfect duplicates of photos taken by the great German photographer August Sander in the 1920s and 30s, from his “People of the 20th Century” project. Both Levine’s versions and Sander’s are now on view at Paula Cooper Gallery in New York. Levine’s best works all duplicate (or, more correctly, appropriate) works by other artists, which makes her the most derivative creator ever – and by that token, one of the most innovative. The visual impact of source and copy may be similar, but their social and intellectual impact are utterly different. Proof of that lies in the …

Read More