Hannah Höch, Weltrevolution, 1920, Gelatin silver print13.3 x 9.9 cm (5 1/4 x 3 7/8 in.)Metropolitan Museum of Art, Ford Motor Company Collection, Gift of Ford Motor Company and John C. Waddell, 1987 © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
This is a re-photographed detail of Hannah Höch’s giant photomontage masterpiece, Cut with the Kitchen Knife Dada through the Last Weimar Beer Belly Cultural Epoch of 1919-20. Apparently, Höch made a few edits to her massive political-social commentary, including a change in this area—the lower right corner—of “Cut with the Kitchen Knife.”According to the commentary on the Met Museum’s fabulous new website/online collection tools, Höch had originally labeled this area of her photomontage WELTREVOLUTION, to accompany the faces of various “Dadaisten” (Dadaists) and other culturally influential figures of the 1920s. Höch later changed the text in her work, to the far less politically-charged “Die grosse Welt Dada,” or “Big Dada World.” But WHY?
And how did I not know this before now? 
For (a lot) more on Hannah Höch’s photomontage “Cut with the Kitchen Knife,” please do listen to a conversation on Smarthistory.org.
And the website DADA Companion is terrific, btw. Chock full of Dada. View Larger  →

Hannah Höch, Weltrevolution, 1920, Gelatin silver print
13.3 x 9.9 cm (5 1/4 x 3 7/8 in.)
Metropolitan Museum of Art, Ford Motor Company Collection, Gift of Ford Motor Company and John C. Waddell, 1987 © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

This is a re-photographed detail of Hannah Höch’s giant photomontage masterpiece, Cut with the Kitchen Knife Dada through the Last Weimar Beer Belly Cultural Epoch of 1919-20. Apparently, Höch made a few edits to her massive political-social commentary, including a change in this area—the lower right corner—of “Cut with the Kitchen Knife.”

According to the commentary on the Met Museum’s fabulous new website/online collection tools, Höch had originally labeled this area of her photomontage WELTREVOLUTION, to accompany the faces of various “Dadaisten” (Dadaists) and other culturally influential figures of the 1920s.

Höch later changed the text in her work, to the far less politically-charged “Die grosse Welt Dada,” or “Big Dada World.” But WHY?

And how did I not know this before now?

For (a lot) more on Hannah Höch’s photomontage “Cut with the Kitchen Knife,” please do listen to a conversation on Smarthistory.org.

And the website DADA Companion is terrific, btw. Chock full of Dada.

  1. prattphoto posted this